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Friday, February 27, 2015

 

Geomagnetic alert for February 28- March 1

A geomagnetic alert a has been issued  by the Australian IPS, the activity is due to a high speed solar wind stream form a coronal hole. The activity is likely to peak late in the evening of the 28th to the early morning of the 1 March, possibly lasting to the night of the March 1. If aurora occur, this may be visible in Tasmania, New Zealand, and possibly Southern Vic, WA and Southern South Australia. However, geomagnetic storms are fickle, and the storm may arrive in daylight or may fizzle out entirely .. or might just be spectacular.

However, the waxing Moon may make it difficult to see displays in the early evening.

Dark sky sites have the best chance of seeing anything, and always allow around 5 minutes for your eyes to become dark adapted.

As always look to the south for shifting red/green glows, beams have been reported too.

The all sky aurora camera in Southern Tasmania at Cressy may be of help in monitoring for aurora,
<http://www.ips.gov.au/Geophysical/4/2> http://www.ips.gov.au/Geophysical/4/2
SUBJ: IPS GEOMAGNETIC DISTURBANCE WARNING 15/02
ISSUED AT 26/2330Z FEBRUARY 2015
BY THE AUSTRALIAN SPACE FORECAST CENTRE.

INCREASED GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY EXPECTED
DUE TO CORONAL MASS EJECTION
FROM 27 FEBRUARY 2015 TO 01 MARCH 2015
_____________________________________________________________

GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY FORECAST
27 Feb:  Quiet
28 Feb:  Quiet to Active, some minor storm periods possible.
01 Mar:  Unsettled to Active, minor storm possible.

Further monitoring at
http://www.ips.gov.au

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Tuesday, February 24, 2015

 

The Sky This Week - Thursday February 26 to Thursday March 5

The First Quarter Moon is Thursday February 26. Venus is prominent in the twilight evening sky. Mars is lost in the twilight. Jupiter is the brightest object in the late evening sky and is visited by the waxing Moon on the 3rd. Saturn is in the head of the Scorpion. Mercury is prominent in the morning sky .

The First Quarter Moon is Thursday February 26. The Moon is at apogee (furthest from the Earth) on March 3.

Evening sky on Saturday February 28 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 20:30 (8:30 pm) ACDST in South Australia.  Mars is low in the twilight, with Venus above it. Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local time (click to embiggen).

Venus is easy to see low above the western horizon in the twilight. At civil twilight, half an hour after sunset, it is around one and a half hand-spans above the horizon. Venus is also just above Mars. As the week goes on the pair separate.

Mars  is low in the western twilight sky. Mars is becoming harder and harder to see as it lowers deeper into the twilight, and you may need binoculars to pick it up. By the end of the week it is lost to view.

Evening sky on Saturday February 21 looking north-east as seen from Adelaide at 22:00 ACDST showing Jupiter.  The inset shows Jupiter's Moons at 22:00 on the 21st. Jupiter is the brightest object above the north-eastern horizon. (click to embiggen).

 Jupiter  is now easily seen  in the evening sky. It is the brightest object above the north-eastern horizon when twilight ends. It is not far from the bright star Regulus in the sickle of Leo (this forms the head of the constellation of the  Lion).

Jupiter was  at opposition, when it is biggest and brightest in our sky, on 7 February, but it will be an excellent object for may weeks to come.  Jupiter is visible all night and is high enough for decent telescopic observation from around 10 pm, although its visibility will improve in the coming weeks. Jupiter's Moons will be putting on a good display in both binoculars and small telescopes.

Jupiter is close to the waxing Moon on March 3.

Morning sky on Sunday March 1 looking east as seen from Adelaide at 6:00 am ACDST .   Mercury is reasonably high above the horizon. (click to embiggen).

Saturn climbs still higher in the morning sky. It is now easily visible well before twilight near the head of the constellation of the Scorpion not far from the bright red star Antares. The sight of the distinctive constellation of the Scorpion curled above the horizon, with bright Saturn in its head, is very nice indeed.

Mercury climbs higher in the morning twilight and should be reasonably easy to see over a hand-span above the horizon an hour before sunrise. It is currently in the constellation of Capricornius.
 
There are lots of interesting things in the sky to view with a telescope. Especially with Jupiter just past opposition. If you don't have a telescope, now is a good time to visit one of your local astronomical societies open nights or the local planetariums.

Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEST, Western sky at 10 pm AEDST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

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Wednesday, February 18, 2015

 

The Sky This Week - Thursday February 19 to Thursday February 26

The First Quarter Moon is Thursday February 26. Venus is prominent in the twilight evening sky and is close to Mars between the 20th to the 24th. Jupiter is the brightest object in the late evening sky. Saturn is in the head of the Scorpion. Mercury is prominent in the morning sky .

The First Quarter Moon is Thursday February 26.

Evening sky on Saturday February 21 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 20:30 (8:30 pm) ACDST in South Australia.  Mars is low in the twilight, with Venus below it. Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local time (click to embiggen).

Venus is easy to see low above the western horizon in the twilight. At civil twilight, half an hour after sunset, it is around one and a half hand-spans above the horizon. Venus is also just below Mars. Between the 20th and 24th the pair are less than a finger-width apart

Mars  is still seen low in the western evening sky, setting just before 9:30 pm daylight saving time (just before twilight ends). Mars is becoming harder and harder to see as it lowers deeper into the twilight, and you may need binoculars to pick it up.

As the week goes on Mars and Venus approach each other, the pair will be closest on the 22nd when they are half a finger-width apart.

Evening sky on Saturday February 21 looking north-east as seen from Adelaide at 22:00 ACDST showing Jupiter.  The inset shows Jupiter's Moons at 22:00 on the 21st. Jupiter is the brightest object above the north-eastern horizon. (click to embiggen).

 Jupiter  is now easily seen  in the late evening sky. It is the brightest object above the north-eastern horizon when twilight ends. It is not far from the bright star Regulus in the sickle of Leo (this forms the head of the constellation of the  Lion).

Jupiter was  at opposition, when it is biggest and brightest in our sky, on the 7th, but it will be an excellent object for may weeks to come.  Jupiter is visible all night and is high enough for decent telescopic observation from around 10 pm, although its visibility will improve in the coming weeks. Jupiter's Moons will be putting on a good display in both binoculars and small telescopes. On the 21st Io and its shadow transits the face of Jupiter from around the end of twilight for about an hour.

Morning sky on Sunday February 22 looking east as seen from Adelaide at 5:30 am ACDST .   Mercury is below the asterism of the teapot. (click to embiggen).

Saturn climbs still higher in the morning sky. It is now easily visible before twilight near the head of the constellation of the Scorpion not far from the bright red star Antares. The sight of the distinctive constellation of the Scorpion curled above the horizon, with bright Saturn in its head, is very nice indeed.

Mercury climbs hight in the morning twilight and should be reasonably easy to see a hand-span above the horizon an hour before sunrise under the Teapot of Sagittarius.
 
There are lots of interesting things in the sky to view with a telescope. Especially with Jupiter just past opposition. If you don't have a telescope, now is a good time to visit one of your local astronomical societies open nights or the local planetariums.

Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEST, Western sky at 10 pm AEDST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

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Thursday, February 12, 2015

 

Southern Skywatch February, 2015 edition is now out at its New Home!

Western horizon as seen from Adelaide on 21 February at 9:00 pm ACDST . Click to embiggen.

The February edition of Southern Skywatch is now up at its new home. 

Err, so what happened to the January edition? Bushfires, heatwaves, family stuff and comets kept me from finishing.

This month a bit of  planetary action  with the opposition of Jupiter.

Jupiter rises higher in the evening sky and is at opposition, when it is biggest and brightest, this month.


Mars is becoming harder to see in the western evening twilight.  Mars comes closer to Venus and the pair are close to the crescent Moon on the 21st.

Saturn is now high in the morning sky. It is in the head of the constellation of Scorpius, the Scorpion. It is close to the waning Moon on the 13th.

Venus is readily visible in the evening sky. Over the Month it comes closer to Mars

Mercury returns to the morning sky. This is the best time to see Mercury in the morning sky. It is close to the crescent Moon on the 17th.

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Tuesday, February 10, 2015

 

The Sky This Week - Thursday February 12 to Thursday February 19

The New Moon is Thursday February 19. Venus is prominent in the twilight evening sky. Mars is just visible in the early evening twilight and is coming closer to Venus. Jupiter is visible in the late evening sky and is just past opposition, when it is biggest and brightest in our sky. Saturn is in the head of the Scorpion, with the Moon nearby on the 13th. Mercury becomes prominent in the morning sky with the crescent Moon nearby on the 17th.

The New Moon is Thursday February 19.

Evening sky on Saturday February 14 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 21:00 (9:00 pm) ACDST in South Australia.  Mars is low in the twilight, with Venus below it. Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local time (click to embiggen).

Venus is easy to see low above the western horizon in the twilight. At civil twilight, half an hour after sunset, it is around one and a half hand-spans above the horizon. Venus is also three finger-widths below Mars.

Mars  is still seen low in the western evening sky, setting just around 9:30 pm daylight saving time (just before twilight ends). Mars is becoming harder and harder to see as it lowers deeper into the twilight, and you may need binoculars to pick it up.

As the week goes on Mars and Venus approach each other, the pair will be closest on the  22nd.

Evening sky on Saturday February 14 looking north-east as seen from Adelaide at 22:00 ACDST showing Jupiter.  The inset shows Jupiter's Moons at 22:00 on the 14th. Jupiter is the brightest object above the north-eastern horizon. (click to embiggen).

 Jupiter  is now easily seen  in the late evening sky. It is the brightest object above the north-eastern horizon when twilight ends. It is not far from the bright star Regulus in the sickle of Leo (this forms the head of the constellation of the  Lion).

Jupiter was  at opposition, when it is biggest and brightest in our sky, on the 7th, but it will be an excellnet object for may weeks to come.  Jupiter is visible all night and is high enough for decent telescopic observation from around 11 pm, although its visibility will improve in the coming weeks. Jupiter's Moons will be putting on a good display in both binoculars and small telescopes. On the 14th Io and its shadow transits the face of Jupiter from around the end of twilight for about an hour, adn on the 17th Ganymede and its shadow transits from around 2:30 am.

Morning sky on Tuesday February 17 looking east as seen from Adelaide at 5:30 am ACDST .   Mercury is below the asterism of the teapot. . The thin crescent Moon is close by. (click to embiggen).

Saturn climbs still higher in the morning sky. It is now easily visible before twilight near the head of the constellation of the Scorpion not far from the bright red star Antares. The sight of the distinctive constellation of the Scorpion curled above the horizon, with bright Saturn in its head, is very nice indeed.
On the 13th the crescent Moon is close to Saturn.

Mercury climbs hight in the morning twilight and should be reasonably easy to see a hand-span above the horizon and hour before sunrise under the Teapot of Sagittarius. On the 17th the thin crescent Moon is close to Mercury.

There are lots of interesting things in the sky to view with a telescope. Especially with Jupiter just past opposition. If you don't have a telescope, now is a good time to visit one of your local astronomical societies open nights or the local planetariums.

Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEST, Western sky at 10 pm AEDST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

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Sunday, February 08, 2015

 

Jupiter Overexposed (8 February 2015)

My image of Jupiter taken through the 114 mm Newtonian with 25 mm eyepiece and my Canon IXUS using infinity to infinity focusing (400 ASA, 1 second exposure). 8 February at 9:30 pmStellarium prediction for the moons at 11 pm

I couldn't be bothered setting up the webcam CCD camera  (anybody got an old laptop with WIndows 2000 they want to get rid off? That way I can replace my current lash up (computer monitor to replace broken latop monitor, and needing mains power as the computer battery is shot) which takes about an hour to set up), so I used the Canon IXUS setup. Unfortunately I can't go below a second exposure, so the image of Jupiter is overexposed and slightly trailed.

Hopefully I will have time to set up the webcam at some stage, but it was nice to capture Jupiter tonight, the day after opposition


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Opposition of Jupiter, 7 February 2015

Evening sky on Sunday February 8 looking north-east as seen from Adelaide at 23:00 ACDST showing Jupiter.  The inset shows Jupiter's Moons at 23:00  on the 2nd. Jupiter is the brightest object above the north-eastern horizon. Similar views will be seen elsewhere at equivalent local times (click to embiggen).

Opposition of a planet from Earth's perspective is when a planet is directly opposite the sun  as seen from Earth. At this time the planet is at its biggest and brightest as seen from Earth (well, its a bit more complicated than that but bear with me).

Jupiter was at opposition on  February 7... at 4am. So go outside and have a look tonight. Jupiter's magnitude will stay around -2.6 (being the brightest object in the sky once Venus has set) for a week, and when it drops too magnitude -2.5, you will need good eyesight and a practised eye to notice the difference.

Unlike Mars, Jupiter's diameter will not change sufficiently to be different in any but the most high end telescopes for many weeks. Last night Jupiter was 45.3 arc seconds in diameter, tonight is is 45.29 arc seconds.

Jupiter is now visible all night long, rising in the east as Venus sets in the west. Easily visible in the evening as the brightest object in the north-eastern skies, it is best for telescopic views, being high enough above the horizon murk and turbulence, for around 11 pm local time on. It is highest around 1 am local daylight saving time (midnight local standard time) above the northern horizon.

Aside from its obvious brightness, Jupiter is easy to find as it is close to the bright star Regulus, the brightest star in the constellation of Leo.  Regulus forms the handle of the hook-shaped asterism of the sickle of Leo.

The following ephemeris is for ACDST, but can be easily converted to local time. Ast Twi is astronomical twilight, when the sky is finally dark, rise, set are obvious and transit is when the planet is due north.


Date         Ast Twi Rise     Set      Transit  Diam " Mag 
07 Feb 2015 21:52:09 20:12:50 06:45:54 01:31:33 45.30 -2.6 
08 Feb 2015 21:50:53 20:08:31 06:41:19 01:27:06 45.29 -2.6 
09 Feb 2015 21:49:35 20:04:11 06:36:44 01:22:39 45.28 -2.6 
10 Feb 2015 21:48:17 19:59:52 06:32:09 01:18:12 45.27 -2.6 
11 Feb 2015 21:46:58 19:55:32 06:27:34 01:13:44 45.26 -2.6 
12 Feb 2015 21:45:37 19:51:13 06:22:59 01:09:17 45.24 -2.6 
13 Feb 2015 21:44:16 19:46:53 06:18:24 01:04:50 45.22 -2.6 
14 Feb 2015 21:42:54 19:42:34 06:13:50 01:00:23 45.19 -2.6 
15 Feb 2015 21:41:31 19:38:15 06:09:16 00:55:57 45.16 -2.5 
16 Feb 2015 21:40:08 19:33:56 06:04:42 00:51:30 45.13 -2.5 
17 Feb 2015 21:38:43 19:29:37 06:00:08 00:47:04 45.10 -2.5 
18 Feb 2015 21:37:18 19:25:18 05:55:35 00:42:37 45.06 -2.5 
19 Feb 2015 21:35:53 19:20:59 05:51:02 00:38:11 45.02 -2.5 
20 Feb 2015 21:34:26 19:16:41 05:46:29 00:33:46 44.97 -2.5 
21 Feb 2015 21:33:00 19:12:23 05:41:57 00:29:20 44.93 -2.5 
22 Feb 2015 21:31:32 19:08:04 05:37:25 00:24:55 44.88 -2.5 
23 Feb 2015 21:30:04 19:03:47 05:32:53 00:20:30 44.82 -2.5 
24 Feb 2015 21:28:36 18:59:29 05:28:22 00:16:06 44.77 -2.5 
25 Feb 2015 21:27:07 18:55:12 05:23:51 00:11:42 44.71 -2.5 
26 Feb 2015 21:25:38 18:50:55 05:19:21 00:07:18 44.65 -2.5 
27 Feb 2015 21:24:09 18:46:38 05:14:51 00:02:54 44.59 -2.5 
 
The Moons of Jupiter are easily seen in binoculars or even a small telescope, and you can see them winking out as they go into eclipse. In larger telescopes, you can see  them (and sometimes their shadows) cross the face of Jupiter. The Great Red Spot (more pale salmon now) can been seen too. Times of notable Jupiter events and when the great red spot is in the middle of the face of Jupiter are given below in AEDST (subtract an hour for AEST, half an hour for ACDST etc.)
 
Mon	9	Feb	0:35	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Mon	9	Feb	20:26	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Mon	9	Feb	23:52	Gan: Transit Begins               T	
Tue	10	Feb	0:09	Gan: Shadow Transit Begins        ST	
Tue	10	Feb	3:30	Gan: Transit Ends                 S	
Tue	10	Feb	3:48	Gan: Shadow Transit Ends	
Tue	10	Feb	6:22	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Wed	11	Feb	2:13	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Wed	11	Feb	22:04	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Thu	12	Feb	5:29	Io : Disappears into Occultation	
Fri	13	Feb	2:39	Io : Transit Begins               T	
Fri	13	Feb	2:48	Io : Shadow Transit Begins        ST	
Fri	13	Feb	3:51	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Fri	13	Feb	4:57	Io : Transit Ends                 S	
Fri	13	Feb	5:06	Io : Shadow Transit Ends	
Fri	13	Feb	6:04	Eur: Disappears into Occultation	
Fri	13	Feb	23:42	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Fri	13	Feb	23:55	Io : Disappears into Occultation	
Sat	14	Feb	2:24	Io : Reappears from Eclipse	
Sat	14	Feb	21:05	Io : Transit Begins               T	
Sat	14	Feb	21:17	Io : Shadow Transit Begins        ST	
Sat	14	Feb	23:23	Io : Transit Ends                 S	
Sat	14	Feb	23:34	Io : Shadow Transit Ends	
Sun	15	Feb	0:53	Eur: Transit Begins               T	
Sun	15	Feb	1:17	Eur: Shadow Transit Begins        ST	
Sun	15	Feb	3:48	Eur: Transit Ends                 S	
Sun	15	Feb	4:12	Eur: Shadow Transit Ends	
Sun	15	Feb	5:29	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Sun	15	Feb	20:53	Io : Reappears from Eclipse	
Mon	16	Feb	1:20	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Mon	16	Feb	21:11	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Mon	16	Feb	22:32	Eur: Reappears from Eclipse	
Tue	17	Feb	3:08	Gan: Transit Begins               T	
Tue	17	Feb	4:08	Gan: Shadow Transit Begins        ST	
Wed	18	Feb	2:58	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Wed	18	Feb	20:44	Cal: Reappears from Eclipse	
Wed	18	Feb	22:49	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Fri	20	Feb	4:23	Io : Transit Begins               T	
Fri	20	Feb	4:36	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Fri	20	Feb	4:42	Io : Shadow Transit Begins        ST	
Fri	20	Feb	21:51	Gan: Reappears from Eclipse	
Sat	21	Feb	0:27	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Sat	21	Feb	1:40	Io : Disappears into Occultation	
Sat	21	Feb	4:19	Io : Reappears from Eclipse	
Sat	21	Feb	20:19	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Sat	21	Feb	22:49	Io : Transit Begins               T	
Sat	21	Feb	23:11	Io : Shadow Transit Begins        ST	
Sun	22	Feb	1:07	Io : Transit Ends                 S	
Sun	22	Feb	1:28	Io : Shadow Transit Ends	
Sun	22	Feb	3:09	Eur: Transit Begins               T	
Sun	22	Feb	3:54	Eur: Shadow Transit Begins        ST	
Sun	22	Feb	22:47	Io : Reappears from Eclipse	
Mon	23	Feb	2:05	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Mon	23	Feb	21:25	Eur: Disappears into Occultation	
Mon	23	Feb	21:57	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Tue	24	Feb	1:06	Eur: Reappears from Eclipse	
Wed	25	Feb	3:44	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Wed	25	Feb	20:07	Eur: Shadow Transit Ends	
Wed	25	Feb	23:35	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Thu	26	Feb	21:44	Cal: Transit Begins               T	
Fri	27	Feb	2:12	Cal: Shadow Transit Begins        ST	
Fri	27	Feb	2:29	Cal: Transit Ends                 S	
Fri	27	Feb	20:08	Gan: Disappears into Occultation	
Sat	28	Feb	1:13	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	
Sat	28	Feb	1:50	Gan: Reappears from Eclipse	
Sat	28	Feb	3:24	Io : Disappears into Occultation	
Sat	28	Feb	21:04	GRS: Crosses Central Meridian	

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Tuesday, February 03, 2015

 

The Sky This Week - Thursday February 5 to Thursday February 12

The Last Quarter Moon is Thursday February 12. Venus is prominent in the twilight evening sky. Mars is just visible in the early evening twilight and is coming closer to Venus. Jupiter is visible in the late evening sky and is at opposition, when it is biggest and brightest in our sky, on the 7th. Saturn is in the head of the Scorpion. Mercury becomes prominent in the morning sky.

The Last Quarter Moon is Thursday February 12. The Moon is at apogee, when it is furthest form the Earth, on the 6th.

Evening sky on Saturday February 7 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 21:00 (9:00 pm) ACDST in South Australia.  Mars is low in the twilight, with Venus below it. Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local time (click to embiggen).

Venus is easy to see low above the western horizon in the twilight. At civil twilight, half an hour after sunset, it is around one and a half hand-spans above the horizon. Venus is also a hand-span below Mars.

Mars  is still seen low in the western evening sky, setting just before 10:00 pm daylight saving time (just as twilight ends). Mars is becoming harder and harder to see as it lowers deeper into the twilight.

As the week goes on Mars and Venus approach each other, the pair will be closest on the  22nd.

Evening sky on Saturday February 7 looking north-east as seen from Adelaide at 22:00 ACDST showing Jupiter.  The inset shows Jupiter's Moons at 22:00  on the 2nd. Jupiter is the brightest object above the north-eastern horizon. (click to embiggen).


 Jupiter  is now easily seen  in the late evening sky. It is the brightest object above the north-eastern horizon when twilight ends. It is not far from the bright star Regulus in the sickle of Leo (this forms the head of the constellation of the  Lion).

Jupiter is high enough for telescopic observation just before midnight, although its visibility will improve in the coming weeks. Jupiter's Moons will be putting on a good display in both binoculars and small telescopes. Jupiter is at opposition, when it is biggest and brightest in our sky, on the 7th. On the 7th Europa and its shadow transits the face of Jupiter from around the end of twilight for about an hour.

Morning sky on Thursday February 12 looking east as seen from Adelaide at 4:00 am ACDST .   Saturn is in the head of the Scorpion, not far from Antares at this time. The Last Quarter Moon is close by. (click to embiggen).

Saturn climbs still higher in the morning sky. It is now easily visible before twilight near the head of the constellation of the Scorpion not far from the bright red star Antares. The sight of the distinctive constellation of the Scorpion curled above the horizon, with bright Saturn in its head, is very nice indeed.


Mercury climbs hight in the morning twilight and should be reasonably easy to see a hand-span above the horizon and hour before sunrise by the end of the week under the Teapot of Sagittarius. In the coming weeks Mercury will be putting on a decent display.


There are lots of interesting things in the sky to view with a telescope. Especially with the comet in the early evening sky.  If you don't have a telescope, now is a good time to visit one of your local astronomical societies open nights or the local planetariums.

Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEST, Western sky at 10 pm AEDST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

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