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Monday, August 21, 2017

 

Seeing the August 21 (UT) total eclipse on livestream

Solar eclipse in Cairns, 2012.

Unless you have been living under a rock you will know that on August 21 (UT) a total eclipse will sweep across the United States. The eclipse (beginning partial)  starts at 16:05 UT (2:05 22 August AEST, 1:35 ACST) on the west coast of the US, ending (end of partial eclipse) at 20:09 UT on the east coast (6:09 AEST 22 August, 5:39 ACST).

This interactive map shows you that path of the eclipse and the timings for partial eclipse and totality along the path. For those of us who cannot be there to enjoy the spectacle, there are multitudes of live streams (weather permitting of course).

Of course, the number of people attempting to watch will be enormous, so be prepared for frequent crashes, but here are some highly recommended  sites (Australians note, this take place in the early hours of the morning for us):

NASA live stream 12pm – 4pm EDT 21 August (2 am-6am AEST 22 August):
NASA TV https://www.nasa.gov/eclipselive 
Facebook live https://www.facebook.com/NASA/videos/10155497958441772/
YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwMDvPCGeE0
Ustream  http://www.ustream.tv/nasahdtv

NASA EDGE  Live from Carbondale (21 August 11:45am – 4:15pm EDT - 1:45 am- 6:15 am AEST 22 August)
NASA Edge https://www.nasa.gov/eclipselive/#NASA+EDGE
Ustream  http://www.ustream.tv/nasaedge
Facebooklive https://www.facebook.com/nasaedgefan/

Full NASA site: https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/eclipse-live-stream

Virtual telescope project (1 p.m. EDT (1700 GMT. 1 am AEST 22 Aug)): https://www.virtualtelescope.eu/webtv/

SLOOH live cast starting at 12 pm EST (16 UT; 2 am AEST 22 August) https://live.slooh.com/shows/event-details/393

Space.com live cast (via SLOOH) https://www.space.com/19195-night-sky-planets-asteroids-webcasts.html 1:30 a.m. EDT (1530 GMT) Aug. 21 (1:30 am 22 August AEST)

The Exploratorium12 p.m. EDT (1600 GMT, 2 am AEST 22 Aug) https://www.exploratorium.edu/eclipse

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Sunday, August 20, 2017

 

Aurora Occurring NOW! (20 August)

Aurora are visible NOW!

They have been seen in Lymington and Abels Bay, Tasmania. The activity may be like yesterday dying off only to pick up again. Current Solar wind parameters are not great Velocity: 767 km/sec Bz: 0.0 nT Density = 9.0 p/cc  but glows still being reported with a Kindex in Hobart of 3. The SWS has issued an aurora watch for tonight due to ongoing activity.  The Moon is waning, and is rising around 5:30 am in the early morning so will hardly interfere with morning aurora. Be patient, as the activity may rise and fall as the magnetic polarity of the wind may fluctuate significantly.

Dark sky sites have the best chance of seeing anything, and always allow around 5 minutes for your eyes to become dark adapted.

As always look to the south for shifting red/green glows, beams have been reported consistently over the last few aurora, as well as bright proton arcs and "picket fences".

Here is the near-real time satellite view of the clouds http://satview.bom.gov.au/
Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.  

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Saturday, August 19, 2017

 

Aurora Occuring NOW! and updated Geomagnetic warning (19-20 August)

Aurora are visible NOW! They have been seen in Bruny Island, Abels Bay, Derwent River and Tinderbox Tasmania. The activity is dying off now but may pick up again. Current Solar wind parameters are not fantastic Velocity: 718 km/sec Bz: 4.0 nT Density = 11.0 p/cc but glows still being reported wit a Kindex in Hobart of 4. The SWS has issued an updated geomagnetic warning  for 19-290 August (UT) due to ongoing activity t from a coronal hole's high speed windstream.  The Moon is waning, and is setting around 5am in the early morning so will hardly interfere with morning aurora. Be patient, as the activity may rise and fall as the magnetic polarity of the wind may fluctuate significantly.

Dark sky sites have the best chance of seeing anything, and always allow around 5 minutes for your eyes to become dark adapted.
As always look to the south for shifting red/green glows, beams have been reported consistently over the last few aurora, as well as bright proton arcs and "picket fences".

Here is the near-real time satellite view of the clouds http://satview.bom.gov.au/
Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.  

A new aurora camera is being installed at Campania, Tasmania. A live feed of the images from this camera is  sill not available.

SUBJ: SWS GEOMAGNETIC DISTURBANCE WARNING 17/39
ISSUED AT 0127UT/19 AUGUST 2017
BY THE AUSTRALIAN SPACE FORECAST CENTRE.

INCREASED GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY EXPECTED
DUE TO CORONAL HOLE HIGH SPEED WIND STREAM
FROM 19-20 AUGUST 2017
_____________________________________________________________

GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY FORECAST
19 Aug:  Active
20 Aug:  Unsettled to Active

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Tuesday, August 15, 2017

 

The Sky This Week - Thursday August 17 to Thursday August 24

The New Moon is Tuesday, August 22. Mercury starts the week high above the horizon but sinks rapidly. Jupiter and the bright star Spica are nearby in the evening sky. Saturn is visible all evening in the heart of the Milky Way. Venus dominates the morning sky forming a triangle with the bright stars Betelgeuse and Procyon and is joined by the crescent Moon on the 19th.

The New Moon is Tuesday, August 22. The Moon is at Perigee, when it is closest to the Earth, on the 18th (There will be a total eclipse of the Sun on August 21 (US time) in the United States, there will be lots of live website viewing for this).

Evening sky on Saturday August 19 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 18:25 ACST (45 minutes after sunset). Mercury is low above the western horizon.

Mercury begins to fall back into the evening twilight sky. It was highest above the horizon on the 12th and  is now heading towards the horizon again. Mercury remains visible around 45 minutes after sunset


Evening sky on Wednesday August 24 looking north-west as seen from Adelaide at 19:12 ACST  (90 minutes after sunset). Jupiter is above the horizon between the bright star Spica and the relatively bright star Porrima. The crescent Moon is below the trio making a nice evening sight, The inset shows the telescopic view of Jupiter at this time.

Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes after sunset). (click to embiggen).

Jupiter is rising before sunset and is above the northern-western horizon in the early evening at full dark. It is between the bright star Spica, the brightest star in the constellation of Virgo, and the relatively bright star Porrima. Jupiter is now closer to Spica.

Opposition, when Jupiter is biggest and brightest as seen from Earth, was on April the 8th. Jupiter is rising before the sun sets and is visible until just before midnight. Jupiter is a good telescopic target from astronomical twilight on, and the dance of its Moons is visible even in binoculars. The following Jupiter events are in AEST.

Thu 17 Aug 19:12 Io : Transit Begins               T
Thu 17 Aug 20:15 Io : Shadow Transit Begins        ST
Thu 17 Aug 21:09 GRS: Crosses Central Meridian
Thu 17 Aug 21:25 Io : Transit Ends                 S
Fri 18 Aug 18:29 Gan: Disappears into Eclipse
Fri 18 Aug 19:46 Io : Reappears from Eclipse
Fri 18 Aug 20:35 Gan: Reappears from Eclipse
Sat 19 Aug 20:14 Eur: Transit Begins               T
Sun 20 Aug 18:40 GRS: Crosses Central Meridian
Mon 21 Aug 18:55 Eur: Reappears from Eclipse
Tue 22 Aug 20:19 GRS: Crosses Central Meridian
Thu 24 Aug 21:12 Io : Transit Begins               T
 

Evening sky on Saturday August 12 looking north as seen from Adelaide at 19:46 ACST, when Saturn is at its highest. Saturn is almost overhead high above the northern horizon.

The inset shows the telescopic view of Saturn at this time. Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time. (click to embiggen).

Saturn was  at opposition on the 15th, when it was biggest and brightest in the sky as seen from earth. Saturn is visible all night long. Saturn is a good telescopic target from 9 pm on. It is poised above the dark rifts in the Milky Way and is in a good area for binocular hunting. It continues to climb into the evening skies as the week progresses.  Saturn's rings are visible even in small telescopes and are always good to view.

The constellation of Scorpio is a good guide to locating Saturn. The distinctive curl of Scorpio is easy to see above the north-eastern to northern horizon, locate the bright red star, Antares, and the look below that towards the horizon, the next bright object is Saturn.

Morning sky on Saturday August 19 looking east as seen from Adelaide at 5:56 ACST (60 minutes before sunrise). Venus is dazzling below the bright star Betelgeuse and forms a triangle with Procyon and Betelgeuse. The crescent  Moon is close to the Venus.

 Similar views will be seen throughout Australia at the equivalent local time (that is 60 minutes before sunrise, click to embiggen).

Venus  is lowering in the morning sky and is visible in telescopes as a "Gibbous Moon". This week Venus forms a triangle with Procyon and Betelgeuse. The triangle is visited by the creescent Moon on the 19th.

 Mars is lost in the twilight.

Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEST, Western sky at 10 pm AEST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

Here is the near-real time satellite view of the clouds (day and night) http://satview.bom.gov.au/

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Thursday, August 10, 2017

 

Astrophiz Podcast 40 (space junk edition) is Out!


In this episode we celebrate our 40th episode and 10,000+ downloads into 50+ countries. 

In this episode we feature Dr Alice Gorman ('Dr Spacejunk') who is a Space Archaeologist and Senior Lecturer at the Department of Archaeology, Flinders University in South Australia. 
 
She is a member of the Advisory Council of the Space Industry Association of Australia. Alice casts a new focus on WRESAT-1, Australia's first satellite launch, positioning Australia as the third nation in space in 1967. She explains how the Voyager probes and the 'Golden record' are cultural milestones which mark humanity's place in the solar system. As one of the few space archeologists on planet earth, she gives fabulous and new insights into the ISS and the treasure it has become.

Follow Alice on Twitter @drspacejunk

I tells you  what to look for in the evening and morning skies, the skinny on the Perseid Meteor Shower, and in 'Ian's Tangent' I shines the light on the Osiris REx mission, occultations, the imminent US eclipse and gravitational lensing.You can follow me  @ianfmusgrave on Twitter and southern skywatch on facebook.

In the News: How big is space? (Yuge!)
Latest NASA missions

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Southern Skywatch August 2017 edition is now out!

Morning sky as seen on August 19 and hour before sunrise. The crescent Moon is close to Venus. Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time. (click to embiggen).

The August edition of Southern Skywatch is  up Yes, it's late, my life is still not on track yet lots of tooing and froing over mum's health.

This month  Mars is lost in the suns glare.

 Jupiter is still in an good position to watch the banded world in a telescope. Jupiter comes closeer to the bright star Spica during this month. On the 25tg the Moon is just below Jupiter forming a line with Spica..

Saturn is high in the evening sky this month. This is a perfect time to watch this ringed world in a telescope. On the 3rd Saturn is close to the Moon.

Mercury climbs higher in the evening sky early this month, and is in an excellent position for viewing. After the 12th Mercury lowers towards the horizon.

Venus gets lower in the  morning sky this month. The crescent Moon is close to Venus on the 19th.

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Tuesday, August 08, 2017

 

The Sky This Week - Thursday August 10 to Thursday August 17

The Last Quarter Moon is Tuesday, August 15. Mercury is at its highest above the horizon on the 12th. Jupiter and the bright star Spica are nearby in the evening sky. Saturn is visible all evening in the heart of the Milky Way. Venus dominates the morning sky forming a triangle with the bright stars Betelgeuse and Procyon.

The Last Quarter Moon is Tuesday, August 15.

Evening sky on Saturday August 12 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 18:38 ACST (60 minutes after sunset). Mercury is high above the western horizon.

Mercury climbs higher in the evening twilight sky. It is highest above the horizon on the 12th and  is now readily visible above the western horizon half an hour after sunset, and is obvious  90 minutes after sunset. After this Mercury heads towards the horizon again.


Evening sky on Saturday August 12 looking north-west as seen from Adelaide at 19:08 ACST  (90 minutes after sunset). Jupiter is above the horizon between the bright star Spica and the relatively bright star Porrima. The inset shows the telescopic view of Jupiter at this time with Europa crossing Jupiter disk.

Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes after sunset). (click to embiggen).

Jupiter is rising before sunset and is above the northern-western horizon in the early evening at full dark. It is between the bright star Spica, the brightest star in the constellation of Virgo, and the relatively bright star Porrima. Jupiter is now closer to Spica.

Opposition, when Jupiter is biggest and brightest as seen from Earth, was on April the 8th. Jupiter is rising before the sun sets and is visible until just before midnight. Jupiter is a good telescopic target from astronomical twilight on, and the dance of its Moons is visible even in binoculars. The following Jupiter events are in AEST.

Thu    10    Aug    18:20    Io : Shadow Transit Begins        ST
Thu    10    Aug    19:26    Io : Transit Ends                 S
Thu    10    Aug    20:20    GRS: Crosses Central Meridian
Thu    10    Aug    20:31    Io : Shadow Transit Ends
Thu    10    Aug    22:27    Eur: Disappears into Occultation
Fri    11    Aug    17:51    Io : Reappears from Eclipse
Sat    12    Aug    19:45    Eur: Shadow Transit Begins        ST
Sat    12    Aug    19:59    Eur: Transit Ends                 S
Sat    12    Aug    21:59    GRS: Crosses Central Meridian
Sat    12    Aug    22:06    Eur: Shadow Transit Ends
Sun    13    Aug    17:50    GRS: Crosses Central Meridian
Tue    15    Aug    19:30    GRS: Crosses Central Meridian
Wed    16    Aug    22:03    Io : Disappears into Occultation
Thu    17    Aug    19:12    Io : Transit Begins               T
Thu    17    Aug    20:15    Io : Shadow Transit Begins        ST
Thu    17    Aug    21:09    GRS: Crosses Central Meridian
Thu    17    Aug    21:25    Io : Transit Ends                 S
 

Evening sky on Saturday August 12 looking north as seen from Adelaide at 20:14 ACST, when Saturn is at its highest. Saturn is almost overhead high above the northern horizon.

The inset shows the telescopic view of Saturn at this time. Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time. (click to embiggen).

Saturn was  at opposition on the 15th, when it was biggest and brightest in the sky as seen from earth. Saturn is visible all night long. Saturn is a good telescopic target from 9 pm on. It is poised above the dark rifts in the Milky Way and is in a good area for binocular hunting. It continues to climb into the evening skies as the week progresses.  Saturn's rings are visible even in small telescopes and are always good to view.

The constellation of Scorpio is a good guide to locating Saturn. The distinctive curl of Scorpio is easy to see above the north-eastern to northern horizon, locate the bright red star, Antares, and the look below that towards the horizon, the next bright object is Saturn.

Morning sky on Tuesday August 16 looking east as seen from Adelaide at 6:04 ACST (60 minutes before sunrise). Venus is dazzling below the bright star Betelgeuse and forms a triangle with Procyon and Betelgeuse. The waning Moon is close to the Hyades. The inset shows the telescopic view of Venus at this time.

Similar views will be seen throughout Australia at the equivalent local time (that is 60 minutes before sunrise, click to embiggen).

Venus  is lowering in the morning sky and is visible in telescopes as a "Gibbous Moon". At the start of the week Venus forms a triangle with Procyon and Betelgeuse.

 Mars is lost in the twilight.

Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEST, Western sky at 10 pm AEST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

Here is the near-real time satellite view of the clouds (day and night) http://satview.bom.gov.au/

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Friday, August 04, 2017

 

Geomagnetic warning and Aurora Watch (4-5 August)

The SWS has issued a geomagnetic warning and aurora watch for 4-5 August (UT) due to an impact from a coronal holes high speed wind-stream. This is expected to arrive late in the UT day on the 4th (which is the morning of the 5th Australian time). The Space Weather Prediction Service has Predicted a G1-G2 storm on  4 August UT (with most of the action after sunrise on the 5th, but possibly G1 storms around 4 am).

If these geomagnetic events occur and result in aurora they could be seen from Tasmania and Southern Victoria, weather permitting. The Moon is waxing, and is setting around 4am in the early morning so will only modestly interfere with morning aurora. Be patient, as the activity may rise and fall of the magnetic polarity of the wind may fluctuate significantly.

Dark sky sites have the best chance of seeing anything, and always allow around 5 minutes for your eyes to become dark adapted.

As always look to the south for shifting red/green glows, beams have been reported consistently over the last few aurora, as well as bright proton arcs and "picket fences".

Here is the near-real time satellite view of the clouds http://satview.bom.gov.au/
Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.  

A new aurora camera is being installed at Campania, Tasmania. A live feed of the images from this camera is  sill not available.

SUBJ: SWS GEOMAGNETIC DISTURBANCE WARNING 17/36
ISSUED AT 0547UT/03 AUGUST 2017
BY THE AUSTRALIAN SPACE FORECAST CENTRE.

During UT days 4-5 August expect an increase in geomagnetic activity
up to active to minor storm levels due to influence of the recurrent
coronal hole.

INCREASED GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY EXPECTED
DUE TO CORONAL HOLE HIGH SPEED WIND STREAM
FROM 04-05 AUGUST 2017
_____________________________________________________________

GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY FORECAST
04 Aug:  Active
05 Aug:  Active

_____________________________________________________________

SUBJ: SWS AURORA WATCH
ISSUED AT 0003 UT ON 04 Aug 2017 by Space Weather Services
FROM THE AUSTRALIAN SPACE FORECAST CENTRE

Effects of a coronal hole are expected to impact the Earth during the
next 48 hours, possibly resulting in significant geomagnetic activity
and visible auroras during local nighttime hours. Aurora sightings are
expected to be possible for Tasmania and coastline of Victoria. Aurora
alerts will follow if significant geomagnetic activity actually
occurs.

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Wednesday, August 02, 2017

 

Partial Lunar Eclipse (Morning, Tuesday August 8, 2017)

Morning sky on Tuesday, August 8 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 03:51 ACST. Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time. (click to embiggen). Note the darkening of the edge of the Moon. Earth's shadow is formed from two overlapping cone-shaped sections. The outer or penumbral shadow is where the Earth blocks part but not all of the Sun's light from reaching the Moon, the Umbra is where all of the light is blocked. This year the Moon brushes the edge of the Umrba. Click to embiggen

On the morning of Tuesday 8 August there is a partial eclipse of the Moon, where the Moon only partially enters the inner, darkest segment of the shadow cast by Earth. This is the first Umbral eclipse since 2015.

Unfortunately, this all occurs in the early morning, so you will need to get up in the early hours to see it. However, to eclipse aficionados seeing a dark sliver carver from the Moons silver glow is worth it.

All of Australia will see this partial eclipse from start to finish. The eclipse is quite shallow, so only a small fraction of the Moons southern edge is in darkness (although the southern half of the moon will be dimmer due to the penumbral shadow).

See the table below for timings for major cities (all times are am on the morning of the 17th). Twilight is Astronomical twilight, an hour and a half before sunrise, when the sky is still fully dark. See here for a map and contact timings in UT for sites outside Australia. Asia and Africa have the best views. My guide to imaging eclipses may be helpful.

CityEclipse startMid eclipseEnd eclipse Twilight
Adelaide (ACST)2:523:514:495:38
Brisbane (AEST)3:224:215:195:07
Canberra (AEST)3:224:215:195:28
Darwin (ACST)2:523:515:506:26
Hobart (AEST)3:224:215:195:41
Melbourne (AEST)3:224:215:195:57
Perth (AWST)1:222:213:194:56
Sydney (AEST)3:224:215:195:19

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The Sky This Week - Thursday August 3 to Thursday August 10

The Full Moon is Tuesday, August 8, and a partial Lunar eclipse occurs at this time. Mercury climbs higher above Regulus. Jupiter and the bright star Spica are nearby in the evening sky. Saturn is visible all night in the heart of the Milky Way and is close to the Moon on August 3. Venus dominates the morning sky below the head of Taurus the Bull.

The Full Moon is Tuesday, August 8, and a partial Lunar eclipse occurs in the early morning.

Morning sky on Tuesday, August 8 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 03:51 ACST. Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time. (click to embiggen). Note the darkening of the edge of the Moon.

After a significant break (no umbra eclipses since 2015)lunar eclipses are back, Augusts  Lunar eclipse is a fairly shallow partial eclipse occurring early in the morning.

None the less an obvious chunk will be seen on the southern edge to the Moon. This will be visible throughout Australia. See here for more details, timings and observing hints.

Evening sky on Saturday August 5 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 18:34 ACST (60 minutes after sunset). Mercury is high above the western horizon.

Mercury climbs higher in the evening twilight sky. It is now readily visible above the western horizon half an hour after sunset, and is obvious  90 minutes after sunset. Mercury climbs away from the bright star Regulus. By the end of the week Regulus sets well before Mercury.

Evening sky on Saturday August 5 looking north-west as seen from Adelaide at 19:04 ACST  (90 minutes after sunset). Jupiter is above the horizon between the bright star Spica and the relatively bright star Porrima. The inset shows the telescopic view of Jupiter on Saturday at this time.

Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes after sunset). (click to embiggen).

Jupiter is rising before sunset and is now high above the northern-western horizon in the early evening at full dark. It is in between the bright star Spica, the brightest star in the constellation of Virgo, and the relatively bright star Porrima. Jupiter is now almost between Porrima and Spica.

Opposition, when Jupiter is biggest and brightest as seen from Earth, was on April the 8th. Jupiter is rising before the sun sets and is visible until just before midnight. Jupiter is a good telescopic target from astronomical twilight on, and the dance of its Moons is visible even in binoculars. The following Jupiter events are in AEST.

Thu    3    Aug    18:36    Io : Shadow Transit Ends
Thu    3    Aug    19:31    GRS: Crosses Central Meridian
Thu    3    Aug    19:45    Eur: Disappears into Occultation
Sat    5    Aug    19:30    Eur: Shadow Transit Ends
Sat    5    Aug    21:10    GRS: Crosses Central Meridian
Mon    7    Aug    19:29    Gan: Transit Begins               T
Mon    7    Aug    22:03    Gan: Transit Ends
Tue    8    Aug    18:40    GRS: Crosses Central Meridian
Wed    9    Aug    20:03    Io : Disappears into Occultation
Thu    10    Aug    18:20    Io : Shadow Transit Begins        ST
Thu    10    Aug    19:26    Io : Transit Ends                 S
Thu    10    Aug    20:20    GRS: Crosses Central Meridian
Thu    10    Aug    20:31    Io : Shadow Transit Ends
Thu    10    Aug    22:27    Eur: Disappears into Occultation
 

Evening sky on Thursday August 3 looking north as seen from Adelaide at 20:50 ACST, when Saturn is at its highest. Saturn is almost overhead high above the northern horizon. The Moon is just below Saturn.

The inset shows the telescopic view of Saturn at this time. Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time. (click to embiggen).

Saturn was  at opposition on the 15th, when it was biggest and brightest in the sky as seen from earth. Saturn is visible all night long. Saturn is a good telescopic target from 9 pm on. It is poised above the dark rifts in the Milky Way and is in a good area for binocular hunting. It continues to climb into the evening skies as the week progresses.  Saturn's rings are visible even in small telescopes and are always good to view.

The constellation of Scorpio is a good guide to locating Saturn. The distinctive curl of Scorpio is easy to see above the north-eastern to northern horizon, locate the bright red star, Antares, and the look below that towards the horizon, the next bright object is Saturn.

Morning sky on Saturday August 5 looking east as seen from Adelaide at 6:10 ACST (60 minutes before sunrise). Venus is dazzling below the bright star Aldebaran and forms a triangle with Aldebaran and Betelguese. The inset shows the telescopic view of Venus at this time.

Similar views will be seen throughout Australia at the equivalent local time (that is 60 minutes before sunrise, click to embiggen).

Venus  is lowering in the morning sky and is visible in telescopes as a "Gibbous Moon". At the start of the Week Venus forms a triangle with Aldebaran and Beteguese.

 Mars is lost in the twilight.

Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEST, Western sky at 10 pm AEST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

Here is the near-real time satellite view of the clouds (day and night) http://satview.bom.gov.au/

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